Latest News | COPING WITH PRESSURE BATTING by Adam Hollioake part 3

COPING WITH PRESSURE BATTING by Adam Hollioake part 3

 
I discussed in part 1 of coping with pressure, the affects of pressure and how they make us react are very real. The main thing that we feel as batsmen is the desire to have the pressure off us. This usually leads to us going for a big shot so as to release this pressure. I always felt the best way to cope with pressure when batting was go right back to basics, to try to distract yourself from the little voices that go on inside your head. I would try to say things to myself like (watch the ball) this is very basic, but you would be amazed how we get ahead of ourselves when pressure is on and start doing maths equations and concluding that the next ball absolutely has to be hit for 4 or 6. Maths and cricketers don’t mix! It is hard enough to focus on the little red ball at the best of times, even more difficult whilst trying to perform advanced algebra and memorize fielding positions etc. A clear mind is crucial here.
The most important thing to remember is the bowler is feeling pressure as well! So don’t give your wicket away. The longer you hang in there the more the pressure goes back onto the bowler. Let the bowler worry about algebra and fielding positions and what ball he is wanting to bowl….You keep a clear head and watch the ball! Break the pressure down into single deliveries! Never look to far ahead….This is crucial. One of the main mistakes we make when chasing a total is to give ourselves a target per over for 2 reasons
 
1.     If we say that we want 5 an over, if someone bowls a bad over we may settle for 5 when really we should have been taking the over for more. Further down the innings nothing is surer than someone will bowl a good over that goes for less than 5, so you had better cash in.
2.     If someone bowls a good over we may get out trying to take it for 5, when there is always an over of 10 somewhere in an innings….especially towards the end of the game.
Try and use all your mind power to tell yourself to stay calm and watch the ball. These 2 things are hard enough to do with out the complications of other thoughts entering your mind!
Under pressure when batting thoughts race causing our decision making to become harder…It makes sense that the more thoughts that are in our head the less attention we can give each thought. I once had a conversation with Michael Bevan (arguably one of the greatest batsman under pressure) he said that he tried to pick one area to hit the ball for 4, if it was there to be hit he would hit it, if it wasn’t there to be hit he had a 2nd shot in his mind to try to pick up a single. I used similar tactics and have to say that I never discovered a better way to chase down a total in my time. The trick is how well you execute these skills whilst under pressure. 95% of dismissals in cricket are caused by the batsman having a preconceived idea in his head as to what delivery is coming and where he is going to hit it. Very rarely will the batsman have a clear head and be telling himself to play the ball on its merits only to be outdone by a delivery that is too good.
To recap:
 
1.     1. Try to utilize all your mind power to focus on telling yourself to remain calm and watch the ball!
2.     2. Don’t put pressure on yourself to score a certain amount of runs off the next ball (unless of course you are down to the last coupe of balls and need an impossible target)
3.     3. Pick an area where if the ball goes into you will try to hit a 4 or 6, if the ball goes in this area then go fro it, if it doesn’t then try to manipulate a single
 

COPING WITH PRESSURE BATTING by Adam Hollioake part 3

 

I discussed in part 1 of coping with pressure, the affects of pressure and how they make us react are very real. The main thing that we feel as batsmen is the desire to have the pressure off us. This usually leads to us going for a big shot so as to release this pressure. I always felt the best way to cope with pressure when batting was go right back to basics, to try to distract yourself from the little voices that go on inside your head. I would try to say things to myself like (watch the ball) this is very basic, but you would be amazed how we get ahead of ourselves when pressure is on and start doing maths equations and concluding that the next ball absolutely has to be hit for 4 or 6. Maths and cricketers don’t mix! It is hard enough to focus on the little red ball at the best of times, even more difficult whilst trying to perform advanced algebra and memorize fielding positions etc. A clear mind is crucial here.

The most important thing to remember is the bowler is feeling pressure as well! So don’t give your wicket away. The longer you hang in there the more the pressure goes back onto the bowler. Let the bowler worry about algebra and fielding positions and what ball he is wanting to bowl….You keep a clear head and watch the ball! Break the pressure down into single deliveries! Never look to far ahead….This is crucial. One of the main mistakes we make when chasing a total is to give ourselves a target per over for 2 reasons

 

1.     If we say that we want 5 an over, if someone bowls a bad over we may settle for 5 when really we should have been taking the over for more. Further down the innings nothing is surer than someone will bowl a good over that goes for less than 5, so you had better cash in.

2.     If someone bowls a good over we may get out trying to take it for 5, when there is always an over of 10 somewhere in an innings….especially towards the end of the game.

Try and use all your mind power to tell yourself to stay calm and watch the ball. These 2 things are hard enough to do with out the complications of other thoughts entering your mind!

Under pressure when batting thoughts race causing our decision making to become harder…It makes sense that the more thoughts that are in our head the less attention we can give each thought. I once had a conversation with Michael Bevan (arguably one of the greatest batsman under pressure) he said that he tried to pick one area to hit the ball for 4, if it was there to be hit he would hit it, if it wasn’t there to be hit he had a 2nd shot in his mind to try to pick up a single. I used similar tactics and have to say that I never discovered a better way to chase down a total in my time. The trick is how well you execute these skills whilst under pressure. 95% of dismissals in cricket are caused by the batsman having a preconceived idea in his head as to what delivery is coming and where he is going to hit it. Very rarely will the batsman have a clear head and be telling himself to play the ball on its merits only to be outdone by a delivery that is too good.

To recap

1.     Try to utilize all your mind power to focus on telling yourself to remain calm and watch the ball!

2.     Don’t put pressure on yourself to score a certain amount of runs off the next ball (unless of course you are down to the last coupe of balls and need an impossible target)

3.     Pick an area where if the ball goes into you will try to hit a 4 or 6, if the ball goes in this area then go for it, if it doesn’t then try to manipulate a single

4.      I cant stress enough......watch the ball and wait for it to be in your area......

 

In my next article Part 4 I will cover coping with big game pressure and will make mention of Tendulkar and Dhoni as a couple of the best guys to learn from.

Part 5 Is a special blog that I have been really looking forward to and that is, How to apply Coping with Pressure to your Workplace and everyday life.

Click here to visit Coping with Pressure by Adam Hollioake part 1

Click here to visit Coping with Pressure by Adam Hollioake part 2

 

Anyway til next time guys

 

Love

Adam Hollioake

 

[caption id="attachment_419" align="alignleft" width="160" caption="Adam Hollioake 99"]Adam Hollioake 99[/caption]

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

Adam Hollioake with the 1999 County Championship Trophy

 

 

 

 

 

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